Genre? What Genre?

Fiction Genres MainGenreThe genre allocated to a book seems to be important. I hadn’t realised just how important until I began to write.
As a book buyer/reader I have never worried about what category a book fitted into and if anyone asked me what kind of novels I enjoy reading I would probably answer ‘most if they’re well written’.
One on-line bookseller, which I will not name, lists 33 different categories of books and, just within the general heading ‘Fiction’, there are 30 different genres.
How a book is defined determines so much about how it is treated by wholesalers and bookshops (on-line and ‘High Street’) and therefore also how easily they are found by potential buyers. But what happens when a book is ill-defined by any of the organisations who deal with a book from the publisher onwards?
My first three books which made up The Iniquities Trilogy, would probably be categorised as ‘Family Saga’ but that might lead people to believe they are for women readers. (Preconceived ideas about what constitutes ‘female’ and ‘male’ reading is a subject for another blog). But all three of those books involve crime (including rape, murder and psychological destruction), an unfolding slow-burning mystery, war-time exploits, spying and the odd love story… so many things that ‘Family Saga’ does not cover.
Highly Unsuitable Girl was a sort of ‘coming of age’ story about a woman getting to know herself and her limitations by the age of 60 odd. Funnily enough ‘Coming of Age’ is not a category used by many. Her Parents’ Daughter was a murder mystery with relationship and spy overtones and then A Set of Lies was a complete change – a political, family history, alternate historical novel. Second Strand is another murder mystery with overtones of the world of spies.
The point has been made that I am doing myself no favours by writing books which do not readily fit into the straight-jacket of any particular genre. It would certainly make it a little easier to find my books on-line or in High Street bookshops if I just wrote ‘Crime, Thrillers and Mystery’.
Perhaps it is easier to build up a following if people know what my books are going to be like – it is certainly true that many authors have made an excellent living by writing the same book over and over again – I will not mention names but I bet you can think of a few.
But with my books being so different from each other how can I build up a fan base unless buyers/readers just happen to find my non-predictable, intricately plotted stories set firmly in their time and place, with well-drawn (if not always likeable) characters.

1 thought on “Genre? What Genre?

  1. This is a good example of how creativity and commercial viability often seem to be complete strangers to one another. It’s not innate – it’s a system we have created for ourselves. The problem is that the commercial literary world needs easily marketable labels, while we authors want to write books, rather than shopping lists. It’s lucky sometimes that we can have more than one subject category for our books – my Spirits series for the 8-12s is a series of ghost novels, but the category heading for this is “Horror and ghost stories, chillers”, and the first and last words may deter some parents buying for 8-year-olds. So I make sure we put “Fantasy and magical realism” as well.

    But isn’t it often those who mix and match genres and create new literary forms who ultimately succeed and create whole new markets we didn’t know existed? I mentioned in an interview recently that a literary agent once suggested to me – again around the Spirits novels – that I shouldn’t mix fantasy, mystery, and family drama. It doesn’t seem to have done the Harry Potter series any harm in the marketplace.

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